HR Advisory

HR Strategic Planning: Taking Deliberate Action Post 7

Training and Development Strategies

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Last week in Post 6 of our discussion on HR Strategic Planning we talked about using Restructuring Strategies to align your workforce with your overall organizational direction. This week we’re going to talk about training! This strategy is so useful in a workforce that is ready for productivity but perhaps lacks the skills or knowledge necessary to move into the next direction.
This strategy includes:
• Providing staff with training to take on new roles
• Providing current staff with development opportunities to prepare them for future jobs in your organization
Training and development needs can be met in a variety of ways. One approach is for the employer to pay for employees to upgrade their skills. This may involve sending the employee to take courses or certificates or it may be accomplished through on-the-job training. Many training and development needs can be met through cost effective techniques. Tune in Next Week when we discuss No Train, No Gain and run through why life-long learning really matters.

HR Strategic Planning: Taking Deliberate Steps to HR Success by Christina Stewart ~ Post #2

Post #2: Assessing Current HR Capacity

Last week we introduced the topic of Strategic HR Planning so this week let’s look at the first phase: Assessing where you are today.

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The first step in the strategic HR planning process is to assess the current HR capacity of the organization. The knowledge, skills and abilities of your current staff need to be identified. This can be done by developing a skills inventory for each employee.

The skills inventory should go beyond the skills needed for the particular position. List all skills each employee has demonstrated. For example, recreational or volunteer activities may involve special skills that could be relevant to the organization. Education levels and certificates or additional training should also be included.

An employee's performance assessment form can be reviewed to determine if the person is ready and willing to take on more responsibility and take a look at the employee's current development plans. Take a look at resumes and references are there any skills your team members have that may be dusty but potentially applicable?

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Based on the organization's strategic plan, you’ll soon be reviewing if the current skills match what’s needed to achieve your goals. Be thorough and take your time here. Once you have a strong repository of skills listed for your entire organization, be sure to add new team members to the data as they arrive and review the list every year or so (after performance reviews is a logical time) to ensure that your current skills inventory remains current.

Check in net week when we move on to Step 2: Forecasting HR Requirements (no crystal ball needed because you’ll rely on sound analysis!)

Why I Love Recruitment by Drew Stewart

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We heard from Christina about why she loves recruitment, now let’s hear from Drew: I came by my interest in Recruitment organically. I was exposed to it through my job as a manager working for a well-established video game publisher. When I would tell people where I worked, the majority of the time I’d get a response such as:

“Oh wow, must be fun to play video games all day.”

I wish! Now that would be a fantastic job! Unfortunately, when you got to the heart of what I did there, it was not much different then most companies. I spent most my time in spreadsheets, developing reports and managing external relationships with outsourced partners. However, there was one thing that I always looked forward to breakup the monotony of a project cycle. That “thing” was recruiting. I took an active role in evaluating my teams and going through skill set inventory to see where we needed to supplement existing attributes. I particularly enjoyed interviewing and getting to know individuals on a bit more of a personal level. I came away from interviews feeling re-energized and infected with the enthusiasm that came from the candidates who wanted to work for this company and be a part of making a video game that they have personally enjoyed. The process gave me tremendous perspective, in two very different and conflicting ways.

1. Seeing people come into an interview and discuss at length about how a product you are a part of has influenced their life, is a very powerful thing. Now, I fully realized that we were not solving the worlds problems within those walls, we were providing entertainment for people. Nonetheless, what we made impacted individuals and motivated them to pursue a career in our industry. It made me feel proud and excited about the future to eventually have even more influence over decision that could make our products even more entertaining and fun.

2. If I loved this one facet of my job so much, why am I not doing more of it?

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I like to simplify my life and the world around me, as much as possible. I find that getting into too many details can paralyze me into a state of inaction. Paralysis by analysis, if you will. So, when I weighed the two different pieces of perspective, one just seemed too simple to ignore. That question of why not do the thing I enjoy, was too simple to ignore and ultimately it is what gave me the motivation to leave a wonderful organization and enviable place to work.

So, what is it about Recruiting that pushed me to making it a bigger part of my professional life? In my simplified way at looking things, I came up with my top three things that I love about recruiting.

Research

I am a natural introvert. Thankfully, like a lot of introverts, I am a genuinely curious person. I love finding out the “why” or the “how” behind how things work or how people think. Through recruitment, I spend a lot of time researching best practices within different industries and searching for the individuals who have the skills that are desired by our clients. I get the time to work independently doing this, which feeds my natural introversion personality.

Chance to be Extroverted

I wouldn’t be a well-rounded individual if all I did was seek out opportunities to stay in my introverted lane. Doing interviews and talking to candidates on the phone allows me to connect with people and flex my extroverted self. A misconception about introverts is that they appear aloof and disinterested in conversation at times. What I find, is that introverts can become extremely connected to people when getting to a deeper meaningful level. Not so good at small talk but we can build a relationship and stay connected as good as anyone else.

Impact someone in positive way

When one takes inventory of their life and lists out important milestones, they do not get very far down the list before thinking about a job they loved or hopefully getting the opportunity to work somewhere they always dreamed of. Giving good news to candidates that they secured such an opportunity if a definite highlight of my job. I help people get the job they want, which impacts their everyday life. Being a small part of it is extremely satisfying.

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I have found that recruiting suits me. I have not regretted leaving that tech job, not for one minute. I feel like I have grown and learned a lot about a number of different industries and the people who drive them. I feel that I am helping to make an impact in a community where I grew up. I still don’t get to play games all day but when the opportunity arises, I do so as a fan and not a job.



Employees Keeping You Up At Night? Read on:

HR Audits Work! By Christina Stewart, CPHR

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A healthcare company leader had employees keeping her up at night. Her main concern was entitlement: tardiness, absenteeism, a spike in peer to peer conflict, giving rewards and additional pay and getting a non-response – or an outright complaint that it wasn’t enough. Basically, she was seeing employees take and take and take and an overall sentiment that the company should simply be happy that the employees showed up to work each day; these team members were lacking in self-awareness and taking no accountability for their actions. The culture was flat at best and the negativity was taking over – people just seemed miserable – especially the CEO and she was worried that it was leeching out to her clients. She had done an employee survey a year before, but the results simply confirmed what she already knew and mistakenly, she didn’t do anything about the mediocre results. She didn’t undertake any changes or take any further action other than simply conducting the survey.

She reached out to us to see if there were a way, we could help in turning this collection of individuals into a true team. Before we could do that, we needed to understand why theses behaviours were happening.

We undertook an audit – interviewed a variety of employees (different roles, departments, tenure, and levels of responsibility) reviewed all the HR documentation (policies, procedures for hiring, promoting, terminating, training, benefits – everything related to HR). In doing so we quickly came to see a few patterns emerge:

  • The first and largest was concerning unclear expectations provided from leadership. Employees weren’t sure what success looked like for their role and they were not connected to the greater goal of the organization. They just didn’t see the value in the work they were doing.

  • There were further themes identified around how the rewards and recognition of good behaviour and reaching milestones were handed out

  • How the policy was interpreted and executed (often inconsistently), and

  • How poor performance was mostly ignored.

We were able to provide specific tactics to take to implement address the above list:

Expectations By setting very clear expectations on how, when and where the work is to be done and by whom, conflicts were immediately reduced, leaving leadership with more time to motivate the team instead of simply running interference. The other outcome of clear expectations was increased productivity. When a leader says “bring in clients” an employee will be creative in determining what that means (Only bringing in one is still an increase, right?) but when the leader says “your job this month is to bring in 10 clients” the employee works directly toward that goal until it’s met – no creative interpretation required. Through this process with us the employer lost two employees who were at the heart of most of the conflict – all turnover is not bad!

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By connecting the team to the significance of the company we were able to increase engagement and of course increased engagement means increased productivity. As leaders we know that productivity equals profitability and of course profitability equals increased rewards for the team. Round and round it goes.

The best part of the story: The Leader finally got some much needed sleep!

If you have any questions about how we can help your organization get to the heart of what’s happening for your team – let us know. We offer free consultations and free HR Pulse Checks to help guide you in creating your best HR strategy.

What Exactly is a Human Resource Audit? By Christina Stewart

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Hearing the word ‘audit’ is often enough to cause most of us to break out in a cold sweat. Visions of Governmental officials in dark suits with calculators and grim expressions searching through the deep dark corners of your finances and your life come to mind. And I’m sure that can be true in some cases – but not in the case of an HR Audit. Or at least not in an audit with Praxis.

When we think about the word audit – we get excited! We think of problem solving and we think of answers and we think of executing on your visions – we think of solutions. The whole point to undertaking an audit is to get an objective assessment of your people practices so you can exact some positive change.

An HR Audit is a thorough review of your current human resources function. An audit will review your HR policies, procedures, documentation and systems as well as interview your people. Areas will often be identified that require some kind of enhancement (or possibly outright revamp) – when the HR function is enhanced you’re that much closer to executing on your overall company strategy and your vision.

Call it an audit, an assessment, an analysis, an examination, an evaluation or a review – it all means the same thing: understanding your HR function. A properly executed audit can tell you why your turnover is so high, why you’re having trouble recruiting, why you have so much overtime, sick time or disciplinary situations. An audit can provide your company with insight as to how your Human Resources behaviour is impacting your goals, objectives and bottom line.

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But knowing why is only half of it.

A comprehensive audit will also tell you what to do about it. And reputable audit companies will also lay out all the options for undertaking change. The really good ones will even help you execute on your new HR plan.

If you truly want to know where you stand with your people and want to know how to get from here to where you want to be, then an audit is exactly what you need. No governmental suits or sweating required.