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Six Reasons to Undertake an HR Audit by Christina Stewart

We recently explained what an HR audit is: What Exactly Is A Human Resource Audit

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This week we’ll run through a few reasons why you might need one. We think of audits as “Elevated Employee Surveys” – just like with an anonymous online employee survey you get details on how your employees feel about their work, but with an audit, you also get a good picture of why they feel that way. Additionally, you get a deep look into how effectively your HR systems and HR processes are functioning. Add on to that recommendations for what steps to take in the deficient areas and you have something significantly more valuable that just an online survey.

Most companies are familiar with the concept of an audit, especially when it comes to the financial aspects of the business. However, conducting an audit of your Human Resources policies and procedures is just as valuable – as we know strong HR functions are bankable. An effective HR audit will not only help you assess the important factors for creating a financially healthy future, it can also provide insights into the qualitative aspects that impact your organization’s culture.

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Six Reasons to Conduct an HR Audit

Here are six ways an audit can provide incredible value for your organization:

1. An HR audit helps ensure compliance with important HR regulations. Staying up to speed on the latest compliance and regulations updates is critical. Whether you’re trying to avoid WorkSafeBC penalties or provide appropriate overtime compensation, an HR audit can help you ensure you’re avoiding any potential fines or penalties.

2. An HR audit helps you stay up to date with the latest employment laws and trends. The business world is changing rapidly, including the laws that govern Human Resources departments. An HR audit can ensure that you’re not only adapting to the employment law trends that are shaping today’s workplace but that you’re also up to date on the general business trends that could impact your organization.

3. An HR audit helps ensure that your employees are being paid fairly. As an employer, you need to know what fair pay should be for your employees. You also need to know how to communicate with employees regarding fair pay and compensation. An HR audit can provide insights into both areas.

4. Accurately classify your employees. As the popularity of freelance work and independent contractors has risen in recent years, so has the ambiguity on how to classify employees. An HR audit can help you determine how an employee should be classified or consider what type of hire you should make.

5. An HR audit can analyze and reduce employee turnover. Employee turnover can be incredibly costly for your organization. Whether you’re looking to capture insights through an effective exit interview or looking for ways to boost morale and improve your company culture, an HR audit can provide insights to help you reduce employee turnover.

6. An HR audit can improve organizational structure and update job descriptions. Whether you’re just starting your business or experiencing rapid growth, an HR audit can help you evaluate and improve the people, processes, and procedures you use to run your business. An employee handbook is a foundational element for businesses just starting out. As your company grows and evolves, an HR audit can help you re-assess job descriptions in the same way you evaluate finances and budgets.

Enhance the Processes & Procedures Impacting Your People

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Whatever specific challenge (or challenges!) you’re facing, an HR audit will help you enhance processes and procedures that are directly impacting your greatest asset—your people. Our team at Praxis Group understands the nuances of BC Labour Laws, the best practices in HR and how it all intersects with culture. We’ll help you understand steps to undertake.

Connect with our team to learn more about our HR audit process and other HR services.

The Benefit of Flexibility by Christina Stewart

Praxis began because Drew and I wanted to be The Boss. We wanted to work for ourselves and have infinitely more flexibility.  I personally was frustrated with asking if I could have an afternoon or an hour away from the office to attend to something for my kids.  I have excellent time management ability and can focus easily, I know how to manage my time with my tasks and saw slipping away from work to watch an assembly or take a child to the dentist as easy and as just part of my day.  Funny, my boss didn’t see it that way. However, I never did ask if I could come in on a Saturday to get ahead of the workload – I just would and of course no one ever challenged me on it. It isn’t that they wouldn’t let me go – if I asked, then I could go – but it was just the fact that I had to ask and that it was tallied up and tracked, used as vacation, or I traded this time at work here for this time at home there and recorded on some spreadsheet and in some database.

As the one in charge of the service we offer now (aka The Boss) I weave what needs attending to at home and at work into my day and my schedule.  It’s the sunny Monday morning of a Long Weekend while I write this – but I was up at 5:30 so I might as well write this blog while the house is quiet and I have the time – right? And come Wednesday afternoon at 12:50 you’ll find me at the school walking my youngest child’s Kindergarten class to the pool for swimming lessons – because it’s important and fun – right? Still trading time but I’m most certainly not tracking it and I’m not asking if I can; I’m simply managing the pieces of my life and my work that matter.

I have a friend in Vancouver who runs his own business with about 20 employees and he doesn’t track lunch hours or what time they roll in each day – and I’ll tell you something crazy - he doesn’t even track vacation.  Not one little bit.  He sets out the expectations and provides plenty of support; guidance and the tools and resources they need to do their jobs. And then: he lets them get to it. If they need a Wednesday afternoon off to walk their kid to a swimming lesson, off they go, without question, without asking.  If they need two weeks in Hawaii, off they go without question, without asking. He hires skilled people with the ability to get the job done without his meddling and then makes sure they know what they are on deck to do.  Then they do it as they see fit, in the times that work best for them. He doesn’t track anything but their final performance and if they are getting the results he needs them to, they are successful.  End of the story.

As Drew and I stare down the barrel of making our first few hires, we’re most definitely thinking about flexibility for our team.  We refuse to make our employees choose between work and family – we aren’t retail, someone does not have to be minding the store in order to get the job done.  Also, as an HR company we fully understand that companies that are willing to offer more flexible job options find that their employees are happier and more committed to their jobs, or even that they get more work done.  So that’s a nice bonus, but in the end we’re offering flexibility because I will trust them and I have better things to do than track and trade my team’s work time with down time – and so will they.