family

A win for the Blind Date by Lindsay Roberts

Lindsay Blog - Date.JPG

Who knew a blind date could be an instant success? A connection you search for but know you may not ever find. That’s what happened to me when a mutual friend set me up on an interview with Christina and Drew (Praxis). Like any interview I had done my research, laid out my clothes the night before, made sure I didn’t have any toddler breakfast on my top and held my head high as I walked out the door… but this was different. I didn’t know what to expect, there hadn’t been a job opening or a formal recruitment, just one person, setting us up on a quasi-blind date. Yet, from the first conversation rally (often defaulting to sports terms) the spark was evident.

I suppose all interviews are like blind dates. Meeting people for the first time, hoping to impress them while learning more about the prospect, hoping you’ll get a call once the time spent together ends. What set this meeting apart was that spark. I like to think I have only taken jobs where I could see my future; however, this was bigger than that, it was a future I had dreamed about but I wasn’t completely confident existed (yet), especially on the Sunshine Coast (where we were moving our family to). Talking with Christina and Drew felt like talking to myself but in action. Ideas were flowing, pens were moving and I walked away with a huge smile on my face. This was it. They had done it, and I wanted to be a part of it!

Since then, it has been exactly as I hoped, working to put ideas into action just as our namesake eludes, and with another new team member (Erin), who was seemingly our missing link! Writing now, my plan was to contribute a blog about my transition into Praxis, but it wouldn’t be right without starting from the beginning…shedding light on the first day we met, the spark that just continues to grow, the revival of the blind date. With no finish line in sight, I am so grateful to be apart of this super star team. 

Good-Bye Morning Ninja by Drew Stewart

It is 5 am. I wake up at this time not by choice, but out of habit. I have recently wrapped up a contract at a company in Vancouver that required me to commute daily into the city from my home on the Sunshine Coast. As most would agree, 5 am is much too early to be waking up and being a fully functioning person. However, necessity is the mother of invention and I needed to develop a morning routine that best balanced optimal sleep and getting out of the door on time. In order to achieve this, I needed to become The Morning Ninja.

I had a routine that was refined and perfected over several months. The morning started by slipping out of bed quietly, careful not to disturb my wife or our two dogs, with the latter having permanently set up residence at the foot of our bed. As quietly as possible, I would traverse through the darkness on my way to the bathroom, guided by cell phone light and the mental blueprint I have of every nook, cranny and misplaced toy on the floor.  Not to brag, but I got to be pretty good getting up and going every morning. I especially took pride in seeing the fruition of my planning the previous night.  Little know fact about being a successful morning ninja is that at least 90% of your success is due to thinking ahead and anticipating. I would have a mental checklist that I’d run every night before my head ever hit the pillow. Not until all of these had been satisfied, did I feel confident that I could get  out the door and on my way to work undetected.

‰        Set out the clothes I want to wear in the morning

‰        Plan route from bed to bathroom

‰        Ensure all doors along the route are cracked slightly

‰        Leave bus fare by the door

‰        Pack portable food for breakfast to eat once out of the house

‰        Continue to abstain from any morning coffee dependency

 

Once out of the house, my whole body would relax and my mind could get lost into whatever podcast I had queued up. I was no longer The Morning Ninja. I was now The Commuter.

I went from the faux excitement of sneaking around my own house, constantly fluid yet economical in movement to doing a whole lot of standing around and waiting. I waited for the bus. I waited for the ferry. I waited on the ferry. I waited to get off the ferry and finally, I waited in traffic on the way to work.  8 hours later, I would do it all in reverse.  

This morning I slept until 7am, brazenly flipped on lights, made noise and got the chance to set my eyes on everyone in the family and it was absolutely glorious. Good-bye Morning Ninja. Good-bye fellow morning commuters. Good-bye alarm clock.

Hello family.