strategic

HR Strategic Planning: Taking Deliberate Action Post 7

Training and Development Strategies

pexels-photo-1457767.jpeg


Last week in Post 6 of our discussion on HR Strategic Planning we talked about using Restructuring Strategies to align your workforce with your overall organizational direction. This week we’re going to talk about training! This strategy is so useful in a workforce that is ready for productivity but perhaps lacks the skills or knowledge necessary to move into the next direction.
This strategy includes:
• Providing staff with training to take on new roles
• Providing current staff with development opportunities to prepare them for future jobs in your organization
Training and development needs can be met in a variety of ways. One approach is for the employer to pay for employees to upgrade their skills. This may involve sending the employee to take courses or certificates or it may be accomplished through on-the-job training. Many training and development needs can be met through cost effective techniques. Tune in Next Week when we discuss No Train, No Gain and run through why life-long learning really matters.

HR Strategic Planning: Taking Deliberate Action, Post #5 ~ Christina Stewart

Strategies, Strategies, Strategies

pexels-photo-1040157.jpeg

As you’ve seen over the past few weeks of posts, HR Strategic Planning is no small undertaking. From assessing where you are now, to forecasting your HR requirements, assessing that gap and then determining a strategy to get there – there’s a lot of work and, well, planning involved!
Developing HR strategies to support organizational strategies is a big job in and of itself. There are five HR strategies for meeting your organization's needs in the future:
Restructuring strategies: Reducing, regrouping and/or reorganizing your team or certain departments within it.
Training and development strategies: Providing your current team or certain departments or skill sets with additional training or the opportunity for learning and development.
Recruitment strategies: Taking an active approach to filling vacancies and promoting your business as a stellar place to work.
Outsourcing strategies: Taking the approach of utilizing contractors or consultants who hold certain skill sets to complete fill the gap.
Collaboration strategies: Finding partner organizations who have what you need and where you can offer something back.
Over the coming weeks we’ll run through each of these strategies outlining what each is and when that particular strategy is best used. Stay tuned!

pexels-photo-1451448.jpeg

HR Strategic Planning: Taking Deliberate Action, Post #4

Gap Analysis

Over the past few weeks we’ve been talking about HR Strategic Planning, we’ve introduced it and we’ve talked about assessing where you are now, and we’ve looked at forecasting your HR requirements. Today, let’s “mind the gap”.

gap.jpeg

The next step is to determine the gap between where your organization wants to be in the future and where you are now. The gap analysis includes identifying the number of staff and the skills and abilities required in the future in comparison to the current situation. You should also look at all your organization's HR management practices to identify practices that could be improved or new practices needed to support the organization's capacity to move forward. Questions to be answered include:

pexels-photo-1246743.jpeg

·        What new jobs will we need?

·        What new skills will be required?

·        Do our present employees have the required skills?

·        Are employees currently in positions that use their strengths?

·        Do we have enough managers/supervisors?

·        Are current HR management practices adequate for future needs?

Next time we’ll dive into developing strategies that support the overall organizational strategies which is no small undertaking!

HR Strategic Planning: Taking Deliberate Steps to HR Success by Christina Stewart ~ Post #2

Post #2: Assessing Current HR Capacity

Last week we introduced the topic of Strategic HR Planning so this week let’s look at the first phase: Assessing where you are today.

pexels-photo-1157859.jpeg

The first step in the strategic HR planning process is to assess the current HR capacity of the organization. The knowledge, skills and abilities of your current staff need to be identified. This can be done by developing a skills inventory for each employee.

The skills inventory should go beyond the skills needed for the particular position. List all skills each employee has demonstrated. For example, recreational or volunteer activities may involve special skills that could be relevant to the organization. Education levels and certificates or additional training should also be included.

An employee's performance assessment form can be reviewed to determine if the person is ready and willing to take on more responsibility and take a look at the employee's current development plans. Take a look at resumes and references are there any skills your team members have that may be dusty but potentially applicable?

pexels-photo-1483937.jpeg

Based on the organization's strategic plan, you’ll soon be reviewing if the current skills match what’s needed to achieve your goals. Be thorough and take your time here. Once you have a strong repository of skills listed for your entire organization, be sure to add new team members to the data as they arrive and review the list every year or so (after performance reviews is a logical time) to ensure that your current skills inventory remains current.

Check in net week when we move on to Step 2: Forecasting HR Requirements (no crystal ball needed because you’ll rely on sound analysis!)

HR Strategic Planning: Taking Deliberate Steps to HR Success by Christina Stewart ~ Post 1

Introduction to Strategic HR Planning

pexels-photo-1483907.jpeg

Integrating human resource management strategies and systems into your overarching organizational strategy will help you achieve the overall mission, ideas, and create the success of the business while meeting the needs of employees and other stakeholders.

The overall purpose of strategic HR planning is to:

  • Ensure adequate human resources to meet the strategic goals and operational plans of your organization - the right people with the right skills at the right time

  • Keep up with social, economic, legislative and technological trends that impact on human resources in your area and in the sector

  • Remain flexible so that your organization can manage change if the future is different than anticipated

pexels-photo-1043514.jpeg

Strategic HR planning predicts the future HR management needs of the organization after analyzing the organization's current human resources, the external labour market and the future HR environment that the organization will be operating in. The analysis of HR management issues external to the organization and developing scenarios about the future are what distinguishes strategic planning from operational planning. The basic questions to be answered for strategic planning are:

  • Where are we going?

  • How will we develop HR strategies to successfully get there, given the circumstances?

  • What skill sets do we need?

The strategic HR planning process

pexels-photo-669986.jpeg

The strategic HR planning process has four steps:

1. Assessing the current HR capacity

2. Forecasting HR requirements

3. Undertaking a Gap analysis

4. Developing HR strategies to support organizational strategies

Check in next week when we break down Step 1: Assessing the Current HR Capacity, and of course, reach out anytime to admin@praxisgroup.ca to get some help in setting your own HR Strategy.

My Unplanned Plan by Christina Stewart

It’s no secret that I’m a planner.  I’m organized and thoughtful about the future and I set goals regularly. So, of course, I take care to plan accordingly.  In my own business we have business plans from each year, strategic plans, marketing plans and goals written down on several whiteboards dotted around the office. I have to-do lists and to-day lists. I have lists for each kid (colour coded of course!) and lists for the house, for groceries, for our dogs and for my husband and me. I have notebooks filled with goals and plans and ideas stashed in each vehicle, each room of our office and home and I’m sure there are a few under couch cushions too.  I’m a big fan of planning.

I tell my clients that planning is a tool that serves both themselves and their businesses.  It is a path to follow that allows for the energy, resources and time of your business and your employees to be in alignment. A good plan will not only tell you where you are going but how you are going to get there.  This is a maxim that I live by in my work and in my entire life. This is what my clients pay us to do for them, and we do it very well.

And yet, we’re about to enter the spring of 2017 and I have no idea where Praxis is going this year.   Seriously. Even typing that sentence gives me chills.  But it’s true.  In November last year, my partner, Drew and I took off to Vegas for a few days to do some 2017 strategic planning.  Except, we were in Vegas and away from the kids and our regular life for the first time in years.  So, we slept and ate and didn’t do any planning.  Then around came December and January – our biggest and busiest months in the life of our business. Followed by a productive February, filled with sick kids, sick adults and playing catch up on all the stuff we didn’t get done in December and January.  You get the idea. Life is busy.  A good busy – a great busy, but still busy.

Week after week, I write down that our priority for that week is “strategy development.”  I write down “we need to define who needs us this year” and I write down “How are we going to let business who need us know we exist?” and I write down “how are we going to best help our clients reach their goals.”  And yet, here we are with no plan.  But here’s the fun part: That has become my plan.

Starting my own business has pushed me in ways I could never ever have foreseen.  I am challenged in a new way almost daily to be creative and put myself out into the world in interesting ways. This whole “no plan” has become part of this adventure for me.  I’m understanding what it’s like to live by an organic system. I’m learning to let the flow of my business dictate where I expend my energy.  It’s a fascinating, unique and developing feeling for me.  It makes me uncomfortable – but there is a huge part of me that is learning to live with discomfort and to actually flourish from what I discover while I am uncomfortable.

I’m not sure how long this departure from my normal will last for me – at the core of who I am, I am a planner and I know that will surface and win out again. Plus, I know that setting goals is actually a sound business practice, but for now, I’m going to let it ride and see where we end up.