sunshine coast

HR Strategic Planning: Taking Deliberate Action, Post #5 ~ Christina Stewart

Strategies, Strategies, Strategies

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As you’ve seen over the past few weeks of posts, HR Strategic Planning is no small undertaking. From assessing where you are now, to forecasting your HR requirements, assessing that gap and then determining a strategy to get there – there’s a lot of work and, well, planning involved!
Developing HR strategies to support organizational strategies is a big job in and of itself. There are five HR strategies for meeting your organization's needs in the future:
Restructuring strategies: Reducing, regrouping and/or reorganizing your team or certain departments within it.
Training and development strategies: Providing your current team or certain departments or skill sets with additional training or the opportunity for learning and development.
Recruitment strategies: Taking an active approach to filling vacancies and promoting your business as a stellar place to work.
Outsourcing strategies: Taking the approach of utilizing contractors or consultants who hold certain skill sets to complete fill the gap.
Collaboration strategies: Finding partner organizations who have what you need and where you can offer something back.
Over the coming weeks we’ll run through each of these strategies outlining what each is and when that particular strategy is best used. Stay tuned!

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Do I Really Have to Pay Overtime? By Kyle Reid

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Paying out overtime is a costly but necessary means to immediately addressing staffing issues or unexpected increases in the volume of work. Staffing is often the largest expense for many organizations and having to pay employees one and a half or even two times their regular wages can drastically increase labour costs. Employers can anticipate overtime and it has become such a common practice, you’d be hard pressed to find many organizations that don’t end up paying overtime wages on occasion. So, if overtime is so common then why do many employers and employees not know more about when overtime is due and how it’s calculated?

The basics are fairly straightforward. If an employee works over eight hours in a day or forty hours in a week, they are owed overtime, right? This is usually the case, but every workplace and employment relationship are different, and many factors must be considered when calculating how much, if any, overtime is due. Some of these factors include, but are certainly not limited to: When does the workday actually start, are breaks paid or unpaid, and what about travel? Getting the basics down is key but building a better understanding of what an employer owes or what an employee is owed is incredibly important from a legal and financial standpoint, not to mention ethical.

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“But my employees are salaried so I don’t have to pay them overtime!” is a common misconception that can lead to years of owed retroactive or back pay. The idea that an employee is salaried because an employer says so is really just an agreement in good faith. If an employee is considered management, or is not covered by BC’s ESA, only then does a working relationship exist where no overtime pay is due. When an employee is entitled to overtime an employer can offer time off rather than overtime pay, or other incentives, it is ultimately the employee’s choice whether or not they receive overtime pay.

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So, what can an employer do in a situation where they know they will require employees to work overtime, but cannot afford to be paying such high labour costs? There are a few options in BC to solve this dilemma that ensures employees are compensated fairly. The first option is an Averaging Agreement, which allows employers to average out an employee’s hours worked in a week to satisfy the 40 hours per week requirement. The second option is time banking, which allows an employee to “bank” overtime hours worked to be paid out at a more opportune time by the request of the employee. The third option, which is our personal favorite, is agreements in good faith. Although not technically enforceable, an agreement in good faith allows employers and employees work together to find the appropriate compensation for the hours worked by the employee. Typically, these agreements offer time off in lieu of overtime pay, and should always be in writing and signed by both parties.

Want to know more? Check out the link below to view the BC “Hours of Work and Overtime” Overview:

https://www2.gov.bc.ca/gov/content/employment-business/employment-standards-advice/employment-standards/hours

Why I Love Recruitment ~ By Christina Stewart

I absolutely love recruiting! Cheesy? Maybe, but still true.

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I can remember the “HR Lady” at my first office job. I was working as an Administrative Assistant at a Brokerage in my very early 20’s and until that point, I had never heard of HR or Recruitment. As I watched her move from project to project and from a senior level meeting to a training session to interviewing for a vacant role in the office I thought she must have the coolest job ever. She got to know everything about everybody. She was the keeper of secrets – all things confidential were in her grasp.

Naturally as a highly curious person myself, I was intrigued by all that she knew about our company, our office, the people who worked there and our future as an organization. It seemed to me that she had her hand in it all – she was part of the big picture strategy and culture along with every other step down to the minutia of how the office functions; she knew it all and her opinion mattered. I wanted her job.

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I started taking HR classes and luckily one of my first was recruitment. I was hooked. The importance of recruitment became very evident very quickly. Hire the wrong person and your workplace could suffer serious implications. The impact could be felt by unhappy employees, high turnover, low productivity, managers spending too much time on management and not leadership, disgruntled customers – the ripples could turn to waves pretty quickly. Conversely, hire the right person and the opposite can happen: happy colleagues, increased retention, increased productivity, managers spending time leading, and satisfied clients.

Beyond how pivotal it is for a company to have the right complement of people I simply like the duties and responsibilities of being a Recruiter. I like speaking with the client to find out what they are looking for and helping them to refine the ideal person with the ideal skills and experience. At the beginning it can feel as daunting as looking for the proverbial needle in a haystack, however, by crafting the right job ads and putting them in the right places along with picking up the phone and talking with people, people and more people, it ends up being more like putting a really fun puzzle together. I feel the joy of putting someone in a role the same as if I were to find the last piece of that puzzle on the floor under my chair. I couldn’t see it right away, but it was there all along ~ Eureka!

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Add to all of that, that I simply enjoy talking with people – I love hearing their stories and learning about why they took this job or how they landed what that company. Everyone has a career story and if you ask the right questions you can often learn a tremendous amount about someone in a fairly short time. I have interviewed hundreds, maybe even a thousand people, in my HR and Recruitment career and every single one of them has something of interest to say. I learn and I grow with each and every interaction.

Telling people that they aren’t successful is hands down the hardest part of this gig, but I see it as an opportunity to provide feedback when someone asks for it, and as an opportunity to treat others with grace. I hope if you were to ask the people I’ve interviewed over the years that they will tell you that I treated them with class and respect throughout the process. I’ve never left anyone hanging, not one of the people I have ever interviewed will tell you that I didn’t speak to them directly to let them know that they didn’t get the job. My attitude is of understanding – I know how hard job hunting can be and how frustrating and arduous to be looking for work but through that process every person has a right to be listened to and treated with dignity.

We do a wide variety of things at Praxis, all of them feed me in some way, but Recruitment really hits home for me with the significance of my contribution, my ability to meet and work with a huge variety of people and how in the end, my perseverance pays off.

December Career Spotlight

Our highlighted job for December is an exciting leadership opportunity here on the Sunshine Coast. 

Our client is an innovative, collaborative and passionate organization engaged in the economic development of the Sechelt and Sunshine Coast areas. The organization is growing quickly and embarking on a number of new business opportunities. They are seeking a Chief Executive Officer to oversee their Sechelt, BC office.

 You will provide leadership to current and future economic entities through joint strategic planning initiatives with the Board of Directors as well as the development of operational plans to support the directions set.  The major focuses are on effective management of existing business and an aggressive growth strategy for acquiring new opportunities. Your Key Accountabilities Include:

 Board Administration and Support: You support the operation and administration of the Board by advising and informing the BoD Members with up-to-date information or reasonably anticipated future events that may affect operations

 Business, Program, Product and Service Development and Delivery: You oversee the operations of the entire organization, set and achieve goals as well as oversee all design, marketing, promotion, delivery and quality of businesses

 Human Resource Management: You develop policy, manage the HR for the organization, including staffing levels, recruiting, personnel issues, discipline and the setting of goals and performance measures for all staff.

 Community, Governmental and Public Relations: You are the interface between the Board and the Community. You assure the entire organization and its mission, business, programs, products and services are consistently presented in a strong, positive image to stakeholders and you will develop strong business relationships with local governments and financing sources

 Financial Responsibilities: You are responsible at the executive level for the budgeting, proposal and implementation process and ensure that all funds are managed as authorized with the most efficient use being made of the resources.

You possess cultural awareness and sensitivity well as a Degree in Business, Economics, Finance, or similar. Equivalencies will be considered. You also have a minimum of seven to ten years of progressive leadership experience. You offer the ability to make good strategic decisions and execute on them, excellent interpersonal and communication skills demonstrated through the ability to facilitate, network, motivate, lead, research, negotiate, analyze, and resolve issues, and you possess a strong sense of personal integrity and ethical practices.  

 Our client offers a value driven work environment, very competitive compensation, the opportunity to make this role your own and to live in a spectacular community with abundant natural beauty. This is a great opportunity to join a developing organization with strong community ties and values that respect the shishalh culture, tradition, and beliefs while you build economic opportunities, aid in developing businesses and creating local employment. 

 If this sounds like the position for you, we would love to hear from you. Please respond with a résumé and covering letter to: jobs@praxisgroup.ca no later than December 31, 2016.

 

Praxis Performance Group is a Human Resource and Recruitment Firm located on the Sunshine Coast in beautiful British Columbia. With our depth of experience and our belief in the unlimited potential of a well formed team, we take the time to get to know our clients and candidates. Focused on fit, we work with organizations who know that their people come first and that their greatest resource is their team. 

Job Spotlight from Praxis Performance Group

Thank you for your interest in this opportunity. This posting is now closed

The Sunshine Coast is no longer the best kept secret in B.C. People are beginning to come around to this beautiful area of the province and realizing that it offers so much beyond the obvious natural scenery. The area is growing and excellent career opportunities are available for people who want to put down some roots in the area. We are excited to share our latest opportunity available with one of our local clients.

Our client is an innovative, collaborative and passionate organization engaged in the economic development of the Sechelt and Sunshine Coast areas. The organization is growing quickly and embarking on a number of new business opportunities. They are seeking an Economic Development Officer to join their Sechelt, BC office.

You will secure funding for economic development activities and programs, assist local organizations, businesses and individuals with establishing economic development plans and projects and help to define the character and trajectory of the economic growth of the organization. By promoting the community you will expand economic development opportunities, build relationships with potential partners, the business community, surrounding municipalities and governments as well as develop sustainable local jobs matching to local employment needs and opportunities.

You offer the ability to make good strategic decisions, excellent interpersonal and communication skills demonstrated through the ability to facilitate, network, lead, research, negotiate, analyze, and resolve issues and you possess a strong sense of personal integrity and ethical practices.

You have a firm understanding of:

Economic development theories and practices;
Business planning and business expansion/marketing strategies;
Financial management and analysis
Statistical methods, principles and trends in social and economic fields
The relevant First Nation legislation framework, legal environment and relevant court decisions, policies and procedures

 

You possess cultural awareness and sensitivity and a Diploma or Degree in Business, Economics, Community Economic Development, Finance, Accounting, or similar. A Professional economic development designation is preferred, however, equivalencies will be considered. You also have a minimum of five years of extensive experience and knowledge in dealing with accounting systems, budgets, internal controls, business planning and asset management.

Our client offers a value driven work environment, very competitive compensation, the opportunity to make this role your own and to live in a spectacular community with abundant natural beauty. This is a great opportunity to join a developing organization with strong community ties and values that respect the Shishalh culture, tradition, and beliefs while you build economic opportunities, aid in developing businesses and creating local employment. 

If this sounds like the job for you, we would love to hear from you. Please respond with a résumé and covering letter, in Word format, to: jobs@praxisgroup.ca no later than November 24, 2016. We thank all applicants for their submissions; however, only those candidates selected for an interview will be contacted.

Praxis Performance Group is a Human Resource and Recruitment Firm located on the Sunshine Coast in beautiful British Columbia. With our depth of experience and our belief in the unlimited potential of a well formed team, we take the time to get to know our clients and candidates. Focused on fit, we work with organizations who know that their people come first and who know that their greatest resource is their team.

 

Good-Bye Morning Ninja by Drew Stewart

It is 5 am. I wake up at this time not by choice, but out of habit. I have recently wrapped up a contract at a company in Vancouver that required me to commute daily into the city from my home on the Sunshine Coast. As most would agree, 5 am is much too early to be waking up and being a fully functioning person. However, necessity is the mother of invention and I needed to develop a morning routine that best balanced optimal sleep and getting out of the door on time. In order to achieve this, I needed to become The Morning Ninja.

I had a routine that was refined and perfected over several months. The morning started by slipping out of bed quietly, careful not to disturb my wife or our two dogs, with the latter having permanently set up residence at the foot of our bed. As quietly as possible, I would traverse through the darkness on my way to the bathroom, guided by cell phone light and the mental blueprint I have of every nook, cranny and misplaced toy on the floor.  Not to brag, but I got to be pretty good getting up and going every morning. I especially took pride in seeing the fruition of my planning the previous night.  Little know fact about being a successful morning ninja is that at least 90% of your success is due to thinking ahead and anticipating. I would have a mental checklist that I’d run every night before my head ever hit the pillow. Not until all of these had been satisfied, did I feel confident that I could get  out the door and on my way to work undetected.

‰        Set out the clothes I want to wear in the morning

‰        Plan route from bed to bathroom

‰        Ensure all doors along the route are cracked slightly

‰        Leave bus fare by the door

‰        Pack portable food for breakfast to eat once out of the house

‰        Continue to abstain from any morning coffee dependency

 

Once out of the house, my whole body would relax and my mind could get lost into whatever podcast I had queued up. I was no longer The Morning Ninja. I was now The Commuter.

I went from the faux excitement of sneaking around my own house, constantly fluid yet economical in movement to doing a whole lot of standing around and waiting. I waited for the bus. I waited for the ferry. I waited on the ferry. I waited to get off the ferry and finally, I waited in traffic on the way to work.  8 hours later, I would do it all in reverse.  

This morning I slept until 7am, brazenly flipped on lights, made noise and got the chance to set my eyes on everyone in the family and it was absolutely glorious. Good-bye Morning Ninja. Good-bye fellow morning commuters. Good-bye alarm clock.

Hello family.