sunshinecoastbc

HR Strategic Planning: Taking Deliberate Action Post 7

Training and Development Strategies

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Last week in Post 6 of our discussion on HR Strategic Planning we talked about using Restructuring Strategies to align your workforce with your overall organizational direction. This week we’re going to talk about training! This strategy is so useful in a workforce that is ready for productivity but perhaps lacks the skills or knowledge necessary to move into the next direction.
This strategy includes:
• Providing staff with training to take on new roles
• Providing current staff with development opportunities to prepare them for future jobs in your organization
Training and development needs can be met in a variety of ways. One approach is for the employer to pay for employees to upgrade their skills. This may involve sending the employee to take courses or certificates or it may be accomplished through on-the-job training. Many training and development needs can be met through cost effective techniques. Tune in Next Week when we discuss No Train, No Gain and run through why life-long learning really matters.

HR Strategic Planning: Taking Deliberate Action, Post #5 ~ Christina Stewart

Strategies, Strategies, Strategies

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As you’ve seen over the past few weeks of posts, HR Strategic Planning is no small undertaking. From assessing where you are now, to forecasting your HR requirements, assessing that gap and then determining a strategy to get there – there’s a lot of work and, well, planning involved!
Developing HR strategies to support organizational strategies is a big job in and of itself. There are five HR strategies for meeting your organization's needs in the future:
Restructuring strategies: Reducing, regrouping and/or reorganizing your team or certain departments within it.
Training and development strategies: Providing your current team or certain departments or skill sets with additional training or the opportunity for learning and development.
Recruitment strategies: Taking an active approach to filling vacancies and promoting your business as a stellar place to work.
Outsourcing strategies: Taking the approach of utilizing contractors or consultants who hold certain skill sets to complete fill the gap.
Collaboration strategies: Finding partner organizations who have what you need and where you can offer something back.
Over the coming weeks we’ll run through each of these strategies outlining what each is and when that particular strategy is best used. Stay tuned!

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Do I Really Have to Pay Overtime? By Kyle Reid

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Paying out overtime is a costly but necessary means to immediately addressing staffing issues or unexpected increases in the volume of work. Staffing is often the largest expense for many organizations and having to pay employees one and a half or even two times their regular wages can drastically increase labour costs. Employers can anticipate overtime and it has become such a common practice, you’d be hard pressed to find many organizations that don’t end up paying overtime wages on occasion. So, if overtime is so common then why do many employers and employees not know more about when overtime is due and how it’s calculated?

The basics are fairly straightforward. If an employee works over eight hours in a day or forty hours in a week, they are owed overtime, right? This is usually the case, but every workplace and employment relationship are different, and many factors must be considered when calculating how much, if any, overtime is due. Some of these factors include, but are certainly not limited to: When does the workday actually start, are breaks paid or unpaid, and what about travel? Getting the basics down is key but building a better understanding of what an employer owes or what an employee is owed is incredibly important from a legal and financial standpoint, not to mention ethical.

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“But my employees are salaried so I don’t have to pay them overtime!” is a common misconception that can lead to years of owed retroactive or back pay. The idea that an employee is salaried because an employer says so is really just an agreement in good faith. If an employee is considered management, or is not covered by BC’s ESA, only then does a working relationship exist where no overtime pay is due. When an employee is entitled to overtime an employer can offer time off rather than overtime pay, or other incentives, it is ultimately the employee’s choice whether or not they receive overtime pay.

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So, what can an employer do in a situation where they know they will require employees to work overtime, but cannot afford to be paying such high labour costs? There are a few options in BC to solve this dilemma that ensures employees are compensated fairly. The first option is an Averaging Agreement, which allows employers to average out an employee’s hours worked in a week to satisfy the 40 hours per week requirement. The second option is time banking, which allows an employee to “bank” overtime hours worked to be paid out at a more opportune time by the request of the employee. The third option, which is our personal favorite, is agreements in good faith. Although not technically enforceable, an agreement in good faith allows employers and employees work together to find the appropriate compensation for the hours worked by the employee. Typically, these agreements offer time off in lieu of overtime pay, and should always be in writing and signed by both parties.

Want to know more? Check out the link below to view the BC “Hours of Work and Overtime” Overview:

https://www2.gov.bc.ca/gov/content/employment-business/employment-standards-advice/employment-standards/hours

Why I Love Recruitment ~ By Christina Stewart

I absolutely love recruiting! Cheesy? Maybe, but still true.

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I can remember the “HR Lady” at my first office job. I was working as an Administrative Assistant at a Brokerage in my very early 20’s and until that point, I had never heard of HR or Recruitment. As I watched her move from project to project and from a senior level meeting to a training session to interviewing for a vacant role in the office I thought she must have the coolest job ever. She got to know everything about everybody. She was the keeper of secrets – all things confidential were in her grasp.

Naturally as a highly curious person myself, I was intrigued by all that she knew about our company, our office, the people who worked there and our future as an organization. It seemed to me that she had her hand in it all – she was part of the big picture strategy and culture along with every other step down to the minutia of how the office functions; she knew it all and her opinion mattered. I wanted her job.

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I started taking HR classes and luckily one of my first was recruitment. I was hooked. The importance of recruitment became very evident very quickly. Hire the wrong person and your workplace could suffer serious implications. The impact could be felt by unhappy employees, high turnover, low productivity, managers spending too much time on management and not leadership, disgruntled customers – the ripples could turn to waves pretty quickly. Conversely, hire the right person and the opposite can happen: happy colleagues, increased retention, increased productivity, managers spending time leading, and satisfied clients.

Beyond how pivotal it is for a company to have the right complement of people I simply like the duties and responsibilities of being a Recruiter. I like speaking with the client to find out what they are looking for and helping them to refine the ideal person with the ideal skills and experience. At the beginning it can feel as daunting as looking for the proverbial needle in a haystack, however, by crafting the right job ads and putting them in the right places along with picking up the phone and talking with people, people and more people, it ends up being more like putting a really fun puzzle together. I feel the joy of putting someone in a role the same as if I were to find the last piece of that puzzle on the floor under my chair. I couldn’t see it right away, but it was there all along ~ Eureka!

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Add to all of that, that I simply enjoy talking with people – I love hearing their stories and learning about why they took this job or how they landed what that company. Everyone has a career story and if you ask the right questions you can often learn a tremendous amount about someone in a fairly short time. I have interviewed hundreds, maybe even a thousand people, in my HR and Recruitment career and every single one of them has something of interest to say. I learn and I grow with each and every interaction.

Telling people that they aren’t successful is hands down the hardest part of this gig, but I see it as an opportunity to provide feedback when someone asks for it, and as an opportunity to treat others with grace. I hope if you were to ask the people I’ve interviewed over the years that they will tell you that I treated them with class and respect throughout the process. I’ve never left anyone hanging, not one of the people I have ever interviewed will tell you that I didn’t speak to them directly to let them know that they didn’t get the job. My attitude is of understanding – I know how hard job hunting can be and how frustrating and arduous to be looking for work but through that process every person has a right to be listened to and treated with dignity.

We do a wide variety of things at Praxis, all of them feed me in some way, but Recruitment really hits home for me with the significance of my contribution, my ability to meet and work with a huge variety of people and how in the end, my perseverance pays off.

Potential Changes to the BC Employment Legislation by Kyle Reid

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BC Employment Standards Act – Summary of Major Amendments

British Columbia’s Employment Standards Act (ESA) lays out the legal framework for minimum workplace standards to ensure employees are treated fairly and ethically across the province. Provincially regulated employers are required by law to run their organization in accordance with the rules laid out in the ESA. Although small amendments to the act are fairly common, significant alterations are quite rare.

In June of 2018 the “Employment Standards Act Reform Project Committee” finished their review of the ESA and made 78 tentative recommendations. Since these recommendations have been made, the Labour Minister of British Columbia has introduced in the Legislative Assembly of BC for the first reading of “Bill 8. The Employment Standards Amendment Act. 2019”. Of these recommendations, significant amendments were proposed to address: Stronger child employment protections, Expanded job-protected leaves, Improved wage recovery, Modernized Employment Standards Branch services.

Listed below are some of the major amendments proposed under Bill 8:

Stronger child employment protections

· This legislation will broadly raise the age a child may work to 16 (from 12 currently) and better protect the safety of 16 to 18-year-olds by putting restrictions on the type of hazardous work they can be asked to perform.

· Additionally, the legislation does provide exemptions that allow 14 year-olds and 15 year-olds to perform “light work” as prescribed by the Lieutenant Governor in Council (aka regulation via Cabinet) that is safe for their health and development (an example given is stocking shelves at a grocery store) with parental consent. To perform “any other work” will requires permission from the Director of Employment Standards.

· The legislation maintains existing regulations that allow children to work in recorded and live entertainment with parental consent.

Expanded job-protected leaves

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· Currently, workers who are trying to escape from domestic violence have no ability to take time from their jobs to find the solutions they need to make life safer for themselves and their kids.

· Changes in the new legislation will provide up to 10 non-consecutive days of unpaid job-protected leaves for those workers, so they can look for a new home, go to medical appointments, etc.

· Additionally, workers will have a second option that will see them receive up to 15 weeks of consecutive unpaid leave.

· Government will carry out an engagement process to determine next steps in making improvements to leave for workers escaping domestic violence.

· The legislation also creates a new unpaid job-protected leave for those caring for critically-ill family members that will align with federal employment insurance benefits — allowing workers to take up to 36 weeks to care for a critically ill child and up to 16 weeks to care for an adult.

Improved wage recovery

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· The legislation establishes a legal framework for regulating tips and tip pooling and protecting workers’ rights with respect to tips and gratuities.

· It prohibits employers from withholding tips or other gratuities from workers, deducting amounts from them, or requiring them to be turned over to the employer.

· It permits tip pooling but specifies that the employer may not share in the tip pool except when the employer performs the same work as workers who share in the pool.

· The legislation also extends the recovery period for which workers can recover owed wages from their employer from six months to 12 months — with the possibility of extending the period to 24 months under some circumstances, such as in cases involving wilful or severe contraventions of the act.

· It also makes collective agreement provisions subject to the minimum requirements of the Employment Standards Act.

Modernized Employment Standards Branch services

· Under the new legislation, the self-help kit is being eliminated as a required step before filing a complaint.

· The legislation will require the Director of the Employment Standards Branch to investigate all complaints accepted for resolution by the branch — improving on the current process of forgoing needed investigations in favour of speedy resolutions.

· It modernizes several other areas related to services provided by the Employment Standards Branch — including allowing the branch to waive or raise penalties, requiring employers to inform workers of their rights and requiring licensing for temporary help agencies.

· Government will also augment with non-legislative improvements to the branch, including increased education and outreach, adding multilingual capacity and providing enhanced service delivery to workers and employers with visual and hearing impairments.

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It is important to keep in mind that Bill 8 is still subject to revision prior to being passed into law by the legislative assembly of BC. However, if passed this will be the first major revision to BC’s ESA in almost 15 years. For more information on the proposed changes, click on the link below to view the proposed bill as it currently stands in the first reading in parliament.

Link: https://www.leg.bc.ca/parliamentary-business/legislation-debates-proceedings/41st-parliament/4th-session/bills/first-reading/gov08-1

#Coastersdo the Beach by Drew Stewart

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Over the month of July, we are celebrating all of the fantastic things that the Sunshine Coast has to offer. By using #coastersdo throughout our social media channels, we will recognize all the amazing activities, events and places here on the Sunshine Coast. Having spent most of my life here, I was the logical person to kick things off.

I begrudgingly came back to Gibsons five and a half years ago. I say “begrudgingly” because I had grown to really enjoy life in the Lower Mainland. I had a career, family, lots of entertainment choices and could even find a delicious meal out at 9 pm. That life ended after our youngest was getting close to her first birthday. Faced with a huge childcare cost, we packed up and headed back home where family and friends were ready to support us in any way possible. Looking back at things now, it is hard to imagine my life being anywhere else but here. Not only is the Sunshine Coast a wonderful place to raise a family but having friends, family and a welcoming community has made our transition back so much easier.

What has been a surprise and one of the best parts of being back here, has been the opportunity to see my kids exploring the same places that I did when I was their age. Most notably, exploring the various beaches that we have access to in Gibsons. After all #coastersdo the beach, right? From my house I have a handful of different beaches within walking distance. Each beach offers something a little different, to which my kids picked up immediately. They love climbing rocks and exploring tide pools, so Pebbles and Secret Beach are of interest to them. However, last week I took them to my favourite beach as a kid, Georgia Beach. As a kid, we always called it Musgrove’s Beach, not sure why. Wasn’t until I was an adult and saw the official sign that I got with the program and started calling it Georgia Beach. The beach is very small and tucked away and full of enough rocks that will keep an aspiring Nolan Ryan busy for hours. To most, I am sure there is nothing special about that beach. For me however, there is a swath of childhood memories gathered from the hours spent there week day summer evenings, after my dad got finished from his shift at the pulp mill. We bonded as a family there, skipping rocks and taking turns riding on logs aimlessly floating through the water.  Now my kids do the same things at this unassuming beach. We get to hang out and have fun in the same place I did ages ago, like time standing still.

I urge you to interact with us on social media, using the #coastersdo tag and tell us about your favourite place, activity or what makes living here so unique. We would love to hear from you.